About

About

Enset is a plant native to Ethiopia that is often referred to as the false banana because, not surprisingly, of its resemblance to the banana plant.
The plant is used mostly for its starchy pseudostems. The stems are scraped for starch, which is then combined with water to become a pulp. The pulp is fermented with yeast and turned into kocho, a type of bread. Each enset plant can produce up to 40 kilograms (88 pounds) of food after reaching maturation in four to five years.
It is an extremely hardy and versatile crop with high nutritional value: rich in potassium, calcium, and iron, although low in protein. Kocho is often eaten with other food, like kale and kitfo, which creates a high-calorie and highly nutritious meal.
Because it is a perennial crop, enset contains plants in several different stages of maturation at once. Its deep roots and high water retention make it relatively drought resistant, and the parts of the plant harvested (stems and roots) are more resistant to bad weather than flowering crops.
Enset is used for more than just food – the fibrous leaves and stalks are used for production of clothing, shelter, and baskets, as well as for ceremonial practices. Parts of the plant are also used to promote maternal health by aiding in stimulating placental discharge, and traditional practitioners use it to help heal broken bones and reduce swelling of joints in both livestock and humans.

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